No Heroics

The Guardian has an article on Heroes today that pretty much says what I haven’t got round to saying on here yet:

http://www.guardian.co.uk/media/organgrinder/2008/nov/18/heroes-ustelevision

I agree with most of the review of the current state of play with the show, but not entirely with the reasons behind it. I haven’t bothered to blog about it in the last few weeks as each episode just seemed to add some many more layers of plot that I wanted to see where it was going before laying my judgement.

Unfortunately they keep using cheap tricks and cliff-hangers to keep the audience interested, but it just seems to increase the level of disbelief. As well as the points mentioned in the article and comments there was also Hiro appearing to kill Ando, and Adam coming back only to be killed off (surely he’s actually dead this time?)

I actually like Matt’s “vision of the future” episode - one flash-forward episode per series is a great way of setting out why the heroes are doing what they are doing, and where things are going unless the world is saved (via cheerleaders or otherwise). Of course, the whole point of this season is for the Heroes (Peter, Claire, Mohinder) to go bad, while the Villains show their good sides (Sylar obviously, Matt’s Dad had a moment of redemption, Mrs Patrelli perhaps). I give it 2 weeks before Claire kills someone just for kicks…

However, I think there are two reasons it feels like it has lost its way (or at least gone the way of Lost). First of all, as mentioned, there is little real character development. This is partly due to too many characters, but it is also because the writers feel the need (or are being forced by the producers/studio) to crank-up the action and shocks. The first series was a real slow-burner if you remember - it took weeks to find out who Sylar was, how characters like Parkman or Hiro fitted into the main Peter-based story, or what the point of Nikki was (what was the point of Nikki again?)

When season 2 started and the ratings fell, I remember reading an article saying that fans were complaining it was dull. Creator Tim Kring replied saying that he thought viewers wanted a slow build up again, with new Heroes and plenty character development. So perhaps the blame should lie on those folk who said that the start of season 2 was too slow and boring.

For the record, I actually really liked Season 2 possibly, I say quietly, more than the first series. Also, I wouldn’t quite yet say that they’ve jumped that shark, but there are certainly a lot of fins in them there choppy waters…

Leave a Reply